Photographs & History

Photographs and History

Celebrating Horseshoe

The Kittanning Reservoir occupies the gap created by Burgoon Run, where J. Edgar Thomson was faced with a decision of spanning the gap or filling the smaller Glen White and Kittanning Runs. The purpose of utilizing the horseshoe design is evident in the elevation changes of the railroad, visible above the gap along the left and right hillsides. 

The Kittanning Reservoir occupies the gap created by Burgoon Run, where J. Edgar Thomson was faced with a decision of spanning the gap or filling the smaller Glen White and Kittanning Runs. The purpose of utilizing the horseshoe design is evident in the elevation changes of the railroad, visible above the gap along the left and right hillsides. 

In 1851 J. Edgar Thomson, the first Chief Engineer of the young Pennsylvania Railroad began construction of the Mountain Division between the Johnstown area and Altoona.  Thomson faced two significant obstacles on the division, how to tunnel through the solid rock walls near the summit and how to get the Main Line from Altoona west up the mountain.

An eastbound descends into Horseshoe Curve, seen from the Kittanning Reservoir. 

An eastbound descends into Horseshoe Curve, seen from the Kittanning Reservoir. 

Thomson's endeavor for the PRR was not the first route over the Alleghenies in Blair County. The Allegheny Portage Railroad, part of the state-owned Main Line of Public Works completed in 1834, utilized a series ten inclined planes, five on either side of the summit, to surmount the Alleghenies. It proved to be a slow and dangerous part of an already arduous journey that required train, canal and these inclined planes to travel across the Commonwealth, taking some 4.5 days. 

View eastward from atop of Tunnel Hill, where Thomson faced the challenge of building the line through solid rock requiring cuts and tunnels nearing the Summit. 

View eastward from atop of Tunnel Hill, where Thomson faced the challenge of building the line through solid rock requiring cuts and tunnels nearing the Summit. 

Thomson opted to by-pass the troubled Main Line of Public Works and the APRR all together, turning west from the Juniata Valley in Altoona. To maintain a route with a ruling grade of 1.8% the new railroad would hug the foothills toward the summit, utilizing the natural topography of the ridge to Kittanning Point. Here, the Kittanning and Glen White Runs converge in the valley of Burgoon Run creating a significant challenge. Faced with a decision of spanning the considerable gap of Burgoon Run, Thomson, instead employed Irish laborers wielding pickaxes and shovels to fill the gaps of Kittanning and Glen White Run and thus completing the arced curve around Burgoon Run that became known as the Horseshoe Curve.

A helper set nears the point of the Allegheny Summit in Gallitzin, Pennsylvania, west of the Gallitzin and Allegheny Tunnels. 

A helper set nears the point of the Allegheny Summit in Gallitzin, Pennsylvania, west of the Gallitzin and Allegheny Tunnels. 


The line over the Alleghenies and Horse Shoe Curve opened on for service on February 15, 1854. Though the State Works attempted to improve their route by opening the New Portage Railroad in 1855, it ultimately failed, later becoming part of the PRR system, serving as an alternative route in times where traffic warranted its use. After 164 years of continual operation Horseshoe Curve continues to be a vital piece of rail transportation infrastructure, a testament to Thomson’s engineering ability in constructing one of the most celebrated railroads in American history. 

Winter Exhibitions

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9 New Jersey Photographers | Stockton University - Through March 28th, 2018 | Pictorialism, Pure or Straight Photography, Modernism, Social Documentary Photography, Post Modernism - like any other art forms, photography has had its share of dominant styles promoted by leading practitioners, critics, curators and by publications, and enshrined in galleries and museums. But today every style, every ism, every mode of making and printing photographs vies equally for attention and appreciation. 

This group of New Jersey photographers represents that diversity in striking ways. Some document the actual world unadorned, from images of the landscape to those of the inner city. Some make pictures that are totally abstract. Some take the world as it is. Some construct what they are going to photograph. Some print using present digital technologies, some using traditional 20th-century chemical processes, some using older alternative photographic processes. Some do not even use a camera, relying instead on light itself or even photographic chemicals alone to create an image. 

In an era where almost none of the billions of photographs made every year are ever printed, this exhibition not only presents some of the wide diversity of image making among photographic artists today, but allows us to contemplate the exquisite nature of the photographic print as an object. 

Stephen Perloff, Curator. 


I am honored to be part of this incredible exhibition curated by Stephen Perloff, editor of the Photo Review and the Photograph Collector. The exhibition, featuring the work of 9 NJ based photographers is on view through March 28th, with a closing reception and talk with Curator Stephen Perloff on Tuesday, March 6th at 5 PM.

The Stockton University is located at 101 Vera King Farris Drive, Galloway, NJ.  The campus Art Galleries are located in L-wing adjacent to the Performing Arts Center; visitors can park in Lots 6 or 7.  


In addition to the  9 NJ Photographers show, I also have several pieces hanging in two ongoing group exhibitions on view in the Delaware Valley. 

Photography 37 - Perkins Center for the Arts  - Through March 26th

Perkins 37th annual photography exhibition exemplifies the best and most innovative work by photographers from throughout the Mid-Atlantic region and beyond. This year's exhibition was juried by Hope Proper, renowned collector, former Curator of Exhibitions & Founder of Perkins Center’s Annual Photography Exhibition. 

Gallery Hours
Thursdays & Fridays 10 am - 2 pm
Saturday & Sunday 12 pm - 4 pm
This exhibition is free and open to the public.

Perkins Center for the Arts
395 Kings Highway | Moorestown, NJ 08057 


2018 Professional Artist Members Exhibition - Main Line Art Center - Through February 15, 2018

2018 Professional Artist Members Exhibition at the Mainline Art Center, in Haverford, PA. The exhibition is a celebration of the MLAC members’ support and creative energy, featuring a range of works from photography, sculpture, painting, printmaking, and ceramics. 

Gallery Hours
Monday through Thursday: 10 AM to 8 PM, 
Friday through Sunday: 10 AM to 4 PM. 
This exhibition is free and open to the public. 

The Main Line Art Center
746 Panmure Road, Haverford PA

Winter News | Interview & Exhibitions

Former Pennsylvania Railroad Pratt truss bridge spanning the Susquehanna River. Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania.

Former Pennsylvania Railroad Pratt truss bridge spanning the Susquehanna River. Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania.

New Interview | The Trackside Photographer

Recently I had the opportunity to talk with Edd Fuller, editor of The Trackside Photographer, a blog focused on the railroad landscape. I am excited to share this interview about my ongoing work and how it ties into a central theme inspired by history. Follow the link to learn more about my process, creative work and how my interest in both the landscape and railroads has woven its way into my projects for many years. To read the interview visit The Trackside Photographer, or click the image above! 

Northward view, Susquehanna River, Marysville, Pennsylvania.

Northward view, Susquehanna River, Marysville, Pennsylvania.

Exhibitions | Current

2017 Members Exhibition | Main Line Art Center
Through January 3, 2018

I currently have a piece hanging in the 2017 Members Exhibition at the Mainline Art Center, in Haverford, PA. The exhibition is a celebration of the MLAC members’ support and creative energy, featuring a range of works from photography, sculpture, painting, printmaking, and ceramics. 

Gallery Hours are Monday through Thursday: 10 AM to 8 PM, Friday through Sunday: 10 AM to 4 PM. This exhibition is free and open to the public. The Main Line Art Center is located at 746 Panmure Road in Haverford PA, offers free parking, and is easily accessible from public transportation. 

South Fork Creek, Soukesburg, Pennsylvania

South Fork Creek, Soukesburg, Pennsylvania

Exhibitions | Upcoming

9 New Jersey Photographers | Stockton University
January 16th through March 28th, 2018

My work will be part of an upcoming exhibition curated by Stephen Perloff, editor of the Photo Review and the Photograph Collector; the show spotlights nine NJ based photographers. An artists reception will be held Tuesday, March 6th at 5 PM followed by a talk with curator Stephen Perloff at 6:30 PM. More information will follow as the event approaches. 

The Stockton University Art Galleries are located on Lakeside Lane, Galloway, NJ in Galloway, NJ. Parking is available at the Lakeside parking area. 

Rau Symposium This Week!

The work of William Rau has played a tremendous role in the ongoing project, From the Main Line, providing both inspirations in an aesthetic and historical context. Learn more about my relationship with Rau's work for the Pennsylvania Railroad this week at the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art - Altoona, where I will present a lecture on Wednesday, August 16th. (Left Image by William H. Rau, collection of the Altoona Public Library)

The work of William Rau has played a tremendous role in the ongoing project, From the Main Line, providing both inspirations in an aesthetic and historical context. Learn more about my relationship with Rau's work for the Pennsylvania Railroad this week at the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art - Altoona, where I will present a lecture on Wednesday, August 16th. (Left Image by William H. Rau, collection of the Altoona Public Library)

Rau Symposium - SAMA - Altoona: This Wednesday, August 16
In conjunction with the ongoing exhibition William H Rau, Urban, Rural, Rail, I will be speaking at a symposium along with Penn State - Altoona history lecturer Julie Fether who curated the show. My talk will focus on Rau's imagery and how it continues to inspire my project, while Julie will discuss how the show evolved, tying in influences from Harvard Landscape Studies Professor, John Stilgoe's writings and ideas on the "art and practice of 'seeing' landscape." 

If you are in the area, please join us! The event is at the SAMA - Altoona location on Wednesday, August 16th from 11AM-1PM, lunch provided, and costs $15 ($14 for SAMA members). Reservations are required by calling the museum at (814) 946-4464 or emailing altoona@sama-art.org. 

Ongoing Exhibition: William H Rau: Urban, Rural, Rail
On view through September 9th, 2017. Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art - Altoona

The current exhibition on display at the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art, Altoona has more than a month remaining and is generating a lot of great feedback so far. The exhibition features a selection of Rau's Pennsylvania Railroad images from the Altoona Public Library collection, along with several images from the Main Line Project. If you are in the area, the exhibition at SAMA - Altoona is a must see! 

Photographs & History Celebrates Seven Years!

View of the westbound home signal, from the Bustleton Branch, Holmesburg section, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Holmesburg was an interlocking and commuter station along the main line and the location where the Bustleton Branch diverged. Countless locations alongside the railroad have a backstory, Photographs & History expands beyond the contemporary photograph to tell these stories. 

View of the westbound home signal, from the Bustleton Branch, Holmesburg section, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Holmesburg was an interlocking and commuter station along the main line and the location where the Bustleton Branch diverged. Countless locations alongside the railroad have a backstory, Photographs & History expands beyond the contemporary photograph to tell these stories. 

One June 17th, 2010, I mustered enough courage to publish my first post, on the blog, Photographs & History. What seemed to be a monumental event was, in reality, two sentences and a photograph, but what would come of Photographs & History is another story. I started the blog to explore the importance of pictures in understanding the passage of time, concerning both personal memory and as documents of change. The blog format allowed me to bring historical context to my images, something I had never considered previously. Since starting the blog, history has become a connecting thread throughout many of my projects. Whether personal or commissioned, it seemed natural for the text and historical imagery to be an integral part of my work to further the viewer's experience. Seven years later, here we are! From the early times of using the Wordpress platform to the current format,  integrated with my website; I have published over 250 posts, from simple one image location views to more complex pieces like the Main Line Series, the blog has become an essential component of my work. 

I look forward to future of Photographs & History, in the cue, you can expect more articles chronicling the railroad, insight on my creative process as an artist, and much more. Thank you to everyone who has followed along, I am grateful for your kind words and support over the years! 

Philadelphia | Lecture Friday, February 17th

Susquehanna River Bridge, Perryville, Maryland. Images like this provide the visual clues of the evolution of the PRR network; the surviving piers of the 1866 Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad bridge spanning the Susquehanna stands adjacent to its replacement completed by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1906. Learn how I draw inspiration from historical imagery to create contemporary images that explore the surviving infrastructure of the PRR while considering its impact on the surrounding landscape. 

Susquehanna River Bridge, Perryville, Maryland. Images like this provide the visual clues of the evolution of the PRR network; the surviving piers of the 1866 Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad bridge spanning the Susquehanna stands adjacent to its replacement completed by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1906. Learn how I draw inspiration from historical imagery to create contemporary images that explore the surviving infrastructure of the PRR while considering its impact on the surrounding landscape. 

Please join me Friday, February 17th at the Philadelphia Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society's monthly meeting conveniently located on Drexel University's main campus. I will be presenting a lecture on my ongoing photographic project, From the Main Line: A Contemporary Survey of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The project explores the Pennsylvania Railroad, one of the most celebrated corporations in American history, operating the largest railroad in the United States for over 120 years. The PRR, as it was known, developed a unique high-capacity network that still carries trains throughout the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region. After the merger of the PRR with long-time rival New York Central in 1968, the network has changed considerably, separated by various successors into distinct corridors for both freight and passenger operations. What remains provides the visual clues of the PRR's monumental infrastructure and its contributions to developing the American way of life.

Inspired by the work of William H. Rau, commissioned by the Pennsylvania Road in the 1890’s to document the railroad and its destinations, "From the Main Line" is an exploration of the landscape along the former Pennsylvania Railroad. Examining both the inhabited landscape developed along the line while celebrating the grace of an engineering marvel undertaken over 150 years ago. Through a two-fold approach, photographs look at the context of the railroad in the landscape and also work to emulate the viewpoint of what the passenger might experience from a railcar window. The story of how this railroad influenced the development of United States is told by illustrating the transitioning landscape, uncovering the layers of growth, decline and rebirth of small towns, industrial areas and city terminals that were once served by this historic transportation system.

The lecture is Friday, February 17th, 2017, part of the NRHS Philadelphia Chapter’s monthly meeting. The program is free and open to the public and will begin at 7:30 PM in 121 Randell Hall (accessed though the Main Building), Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Drexel University's campus is centrally located near 30th Street Station and is easily accessible by bus, rapid transit and regional rail. For more information please contact me directly at Michael@michaelfroio.com. 

Quarryville | 19th Century Railroading With Big Aspirations

TM Fowler Map circa 1903, illustrating the town of Quarryville. Though construction of the A&S had just commenced in 1903, the line is clearly depicted In the bottom left corner, complete with a connection between the new route and Quarryville Branch that was never constructed. Collection of the Southern Lancaster County Historical Society scanned from Mary Boomsma

TM Fowler Map circa 1903, illustrating the town of Quarryville. Though construction of the A&S had just commenced in 1903, the line is clearly depicted In the bottom left corner, complete with a connection between the new route and Quarryville Branch that was never constructed. Collection of the Southern Lancaster County Historical Society scanned from Mary Boomsma

Quarryville has always been a crossroad of activity in the fertile farmlands of Southern Lancaster County. Farmers purchased lumber, grain, and fertilizer here and reciprocally exchanged their bounties in town and beyond via the local county railroad, a lifeline to the outside world. Commonly known as the Quarryville Branch this rail line had an interesting early history that started with big hopes and ended with financial disaster. The Lancaster & Reading Narrow Gauge Railroad was chartered in 1871 to build a narrow gauge network between Safe Harbor and Reading via Lancaster including a branch to Quarryville, competing directly with the neighboring Reading Company subsidiary the Reading & Columbia.  Before construction commenced it was decided to build the line to standard gauge instead, but the Panic of 1873 quickly stalled progress. Falling into financial distress, the Lancaster & Reading Narrow Gauge Railroad was ironically leased to the Reading Company becoming an extension of its Lancaster Branch, part of the R&C. 

A typical PRR train traversing the former Lancaster & Reading Narrow Gauge Railroad between Lancaster and its southern terminus in Quarryville. Walter G. Minnich Jr. collection

A typical PRR train traversing the former Lancaster & Reading Narrow Gauge Railroad between Lancaster and its southern terminus in Quarryville. Walter G. Minnich Jr. collection

With the contract secured for the branch to Quarryville, the Reading looked to another opportunity, the potential of connecting with the B&O mainline by extending south from Quarryville to Elkton, MD, a move that would involve the financially strapped narrow gauge railroad the Lancaster, Oxford & Southern. When presented the idea of becoming a bridge route, the LO&S optimistically commenced plans to build new extensions on its existing route including a new line to Quarryville, with the intention of everything being converted to standard gauge. Once complete perhaps the small common carrier would see financial success or even be purchased at a profit by the Reading or the B&O. The plan, however, began to crumble when the Lancaster & Reading Narrow Gauge Railroad defaulted on their mortgage, rendering the Reading lease null and void, and the property went up for auction in 1900. At the Philadelphia Stock Exchange, a tense bidding war played out between extended representatives of the B&O, Reading Company and PRR. Charles H. Locher, a Lancaster businessman, minor shareholder of the L&RNGR and friend of the PRR attended the auction, outbidding the competition and thus protecting their coveted territory by eliminating the plan for the competitor's line once and for all. Regardless the LO&S completed the branch to Quarryville but the hopes for financial success or being converted to standard gauge were never realized, the railroad toiled in bankruptcy through 1910 scrapping its Quarryville Branch in 1917 with the rest of the railroad ceasing operation the following year. 

Quarryville Station, view before the Lancaster Oxford & Southern abandonment in 1917. Note the dual gauge trackage in the foreground, an area shared by the LO&S and the PRR. Image Walter G. Minnich Jr. collection, Southern Lancaster County Historical Society

Quarryville Station, view before the Lancaster Oxford & Southern abandonment in 1917. Note the dual gauge trackage in the foreground, an area shared by the LO&S and the PRR. Image Walter G. Minnich Jr. collection, Southern Lancaster County Historical Society

While the drama of railroad barons and hopes of back-road competition unraveled, another chapter in railroad history was playing out in the small town. The PRR commenced construction of the new Low Grade route across Southern Lancaster County. Situated at the approximate center of the eastern segment of the new Atglen & Susquehanna Branch, Quarryville was the epicenter of construction and staging between 1903 and 1906. Despite the building of the new line, it was very evident that the PRR had no intention to tap the small agricultural market with any additional resources other than the branch it maintained from Lancaster. When construction was completed the A&S cut through the Borough on an elevated fill with little more than a water stop, a telephone box and overpasses over its branch and another on Church Street. 

Pennsylvania Railroad track chart showing the grades and curvature of the former Lancaster & Reading Narrow Gauge Quarryville Branch circa 1940. 

Pennsylvania Railroad track chart showing the grades and curvature of the former Lancaster & Reading Narrow Gauge Quarryville Branch circa 1940. 

For the next half a century the railroads continued to operate separately from one another. As the PRR entered its final year's maintenance on marginally performing branches were often deferred, and the Quarryville Branch was certainly no exception. Entering the Penn Central era, with finances already tight, management looked to shed money-losing lines; the Quarryville Branch made the short list when the Penn Central petitioned the ICC for the abandonment of over 138 line segments in 1971. Making matters worse the branch suffered an even greater blow in 1972 when it sustained significant damage from Hurricane Agnes placing most of the branch out of service.  Regardless, the shippers in Quarryville rallied, seeking a deal with Penn Central, who had estimated that a 1700’ line connection to the A&S would come with a price tag of $130,000 a burden the broken railroad could not afford. Shippers agreed to pay the cost of construction, and the PC withdrew 2.26 miles from the ICC petition, saving the most lucrative piece of the branch and rail service to local shippers. Finally, after 67 years of trains flying over the town, Quarryville had a connection to the A&S, but that too would only last another 15 years.  

From the Main Line | Upcoming Exhibiton

I am excited to share the details on my upcoming exhibition in Scranton, Pennsylvania featuring work from the ongoing project, From the Main Line. Scranton, though never served by the PRR could not be more of an appropriate venue to put together an exhibition exploring the relationship between railroads and the landscapes they travel. The Electric City is situated in the heart of Anthracite Coal Country and has a rich history largely associated with being at the crossroads of six railroad companies at its peak and home to the the sprawling Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad locomotive shops.  The railroads played an important role in the city of Scranton, providing extensive access to the nation's rail network while providing a wealth of jobs to the regional economy, much like the many places I’ve photographed throughout my time on the PRR.

Today Scranton is home to several major universities, the Steamtown National Historical Site as well as several other interpretive museums that explore the role railroads and coal played in the regional economy. Plan a trip to see the exhibition and visit some area attractions; the city is very easy to navigate and there are several wonderful places to stay in town and of course, plenty of choices for lunch and dinner. The exhibition opens next Friday, March 4th and will run through April 30th at the Camera Work space, located in the Marquis Gallery, in the historic Laundry building in downtown Scranton, Pennsylvania.

Hope to see some familiar faces at the opening!

Sincerely, 

Michael Froio

Happy Holidays from Michael Froio Photography

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Friends, As 2014 winds down and we are amidst the holiday season I’d like to take a moment to thank everyone for all the wonderful words and support. Between formally becoming a small business owner, commercial commissions, lectures, curating an exhibition, writing, research and making photographs for the Main Line Project it has been a truly amazing year. I look forward to taking the final days of 2014 to reflect on the year and spend some much-needed time with the family. Looking forward to 2015 there is a number of events on the horizon,more information will follow after the start of the New Year. I have taken a moment to assemble here some of my favorite holiday posts from years past, enjoy and happy holidays from my family to yours!

Sincerely,

Michael Froio

Holiday Traditions: Story of the Night before Christmas Paintings by PRR employee William W. Seigford Jr.

This time of year, family and friends come together to celebrate the holidays with traditions developed over generations. As a part of our family tradition I have the pleasure to read to my children on Christmas Eve as my father did before, the fabled poem, The Night Before Christmas by Clement Clark Moore. First published anonymously in December of 1823, it is now the tradition in many American families to read the poem on Christmas Eve.

The story and illustrations presented here were made in 1953 by Pennsylvania Railroad employee, William W. Seigford Jr. who maintained an office at the Harrisburg Passenger Station. They were displayed in the station during the Christmas season alternating with other decorations for several years until Seigford was transferred to Cincinnati in 1956. The paintings were never displayed in Cincinnati but remained in Seigford’s possession until he retired from Penn Central as General Foreman of Passenger Locomotives and Cars in July of 1974. After retirement he returned to the Lancaster area and subsequently donated the paintings to Amtrak’s Lancaster Passenger Station for display during the Christmas season. Surviving the Pennsylvania Railroad and Penn Central, all 12 original paintings hang proudly in the beautiful 1929 waiting room under the watchful eye of Amtrak employees Richard Peiffer and Donna Whitney, who facilitated the making of these reproductions for future preservation.

I would like to acknowledge Mr. William (Bill) L. Seigford for his help on this post as well as his continued support on the Main Line Project, his knowledge and generosity have been a invaluable resource.

The Lionel Corporation: Model Railroad Icon of the Holiday Season

Page 12-13 of Lionel's 1947 product catalog illustrating the deluxe train sets # 1447WS and 1459WS featuring accessories including the log dump car and working cattle pen. Note the locomotive which is modeled after the PRR's failed S2 steam turbine locomotive, which ironically Lionel produced more of than the Juniata Shops!  Original 1947 catalog collection of the author.

Page 12-13 of Lionel's 1947 product catalog illustrating the deluxe train sets # 1447WS and 1459WS featuring accessories including the log dump car and working cattle pen. Note the locomotive which is modeled after the PRR's failed S2 steam turbine locomotive, which ironically Lionel produced more of than the Juniata Shops!  Original 1947 catalog collection of the author.

With modest beginnings Joshua Lionel Cowen and Harry C. Grant founded the Lionel Corporation in 1900, building model trains for retail window displays to help draw consumers to their stores. In 1906 the company responded to the increasing demand for the electric trains in the consumer market and developed its trademark three-rail “standard gage” track to simplify wiring and use of accessories.  By 1915 Lionel would supplement the large standard gage with the budget minded O scale which would later become the standard size of their product lines. Lionel’s use of sharp advertising was ultimately responsible for tying model trains to Christmas, making them popular presents during the holidays, establishing traditions that survive today.  By WWI Lionel was one of three major US manufactures of toy trains, surpassing competitor Ives as the market leader by the 1920’s. Lionel’s growth and aggressive ad campaigns further led to Ives' bankruptcy in 1928.

Lionel 027 gage locomotives and tenders! No Lionel layout was complete with extra motive power, this includes many Pennsy inspired locomotives lettered in both the classic Lionel Lines and PRR. Original 1947 catalog collection of the author. 

Lionel 027 gage locomotives and tenders! No Lionel layout was complete with extra motive power, this includes many Pennsy inspired locomotives lettered in both the classic Lionel Lines and PRR. Original 1947 catalog collection of the author. 

Like many other companies, the Great Depression would be a severe detriment to Lionel’s business, as a result their 1927 operating profit of over $500,000 plummeted to $82,000 in 1930, and ultimately a loss in 1931 of over $200,000 putting Lionel into receivership by May of 1934. A product credited with saving Lionel during the Depression era was a wind up hand car featuring Mickey and Minnie Mouse which Lionel sold well over 250,00 units providing the cash flow to keep the company from closing.

"From the Ranch Lands and Dairy Country!" Lionel was well known for there operating accessories including the Cattle Car and Milk cars both which were accompanied by track side platforms for loading and unloading. Original 1947 catalog collection of the author.

"From the Ranch Lands and Dairy Country!" Lionel was well known for there operating accessories including the Cattle Car and Milk cars both which were accompanied by track side platforms for loading and unloading. Original 1947 catalog collection of the author.

In 1942 Lionel ceased toy production to produce items for the United States Navy during World War II. Regardless of the lack of toy train production, the advertising department pushed heavily to urge American teenagers to start planning their post-war layouts. By late 1945 Lionel resumed production, replacing their original product lines with more realistic trains and accessories exclusively in O Scale. Considered by many aficionados as the golden years, 1946-1956 saw sales soaring with new items including the famous Santa Fe Warbonnet EMD F3 locomotives as well as the Pennsylvania Railroad GGI and experimental S2 steam turbine locomotive. During the 1950s Lionel would tout its short-lived title of largest toy manufacturer, out selling American Flyer almost 2:1. After 1955 sales declined steadily with the rising popularity of the smaller but more realistic HO Scale and to many the end of the true “Lionel era” was in 1959. Over the years Lionel was diversified unsuccessfully and the name survived in different ways including retail toy outlet Lionel Kiddy City. Today the Lionel name remains the most famous name in model trains, though not associated with the original corporation, Lionel LLC owns most of the product rights and trademarks continuing the legacy started by American businessmen Joshua Lionel and Harry Grant well over 100 years ago.

Holiday Travel: A vintage add from the Pennsylvania Railroad

prr_night-beforexams

Giving Thanks: 2013

PRR

Dear Friends,

The year 2013 has been yet another year of incredible growth for the Main Line Project. Tallying five lectures, a new website, 29 blog posts, 10 field visits to former Pennsylvania Railroad facilities and now commercial project commissions I look back and wonder how I was able to do anything else this year! As we near Thanksgiving I want to say thank you to all of you who have shared your knowledge, supported me and encouraged this project, justifying the countless hours of work I have invested. Having the opportunity to work with so many like-minded people and share with such a diverse community is truly what makes the project so rewarding.

From my family to yours, have a safe and wonderful Thanksgiving!

Sincerely,

Michael Froio 

Why Document the Pennsylvania Railroad?

Advertisement circa 1944 illustrating the diversity of areas served by the PRR. Collection of the    John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History   , Duke University Libraries.

Advertisement circa 1944 illustrating the diversity of areas served by the PRR. Collection of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History, Duke University Libraries.

To preface the question why document the Pennsylvania Railroad, I would like to quote several excerpts from Fortune Magazine’s 1936 2-part article on the PRR. “Do not think of the Pennsylvania as a business enterprise. Think of it as a nation. It is a nation bigger than Turkey or Uruguay. Corporately it behaves like a nation; it blankets the lives of a 100,000 citizens like a nation…The Pennsylvania is the most powerful off all the railroad nations in the Northern Hemisphere. If all were of its size there would need be only 10 railroads in the US instead of some 200. The Pennsylvania’s revenues are 11% of all railroad revenues. Its employees are 12% off all railroad employees, receiving 11% of all railroad wages…One of every 10 locomotives in the US are owned by the Pennsylvania, as do 13.7 percent of all freight cars, and 15 percent of all passenger cars. A dime of every dollar invested on all railroads has been spent to build the Pennsylvania…Every one hundred tons of freight that moved a mile by rail in 1933, the PRR carried 10 and it carried one passenger of every five. Half the people of the US live in the territory it drains - which is the central east from St. Louis and Chicago to Long Island and the Chesapeake Bay.”

 At the time this article was written the Nation was recovering from the Great Depression, the PRR was in the midst of system improvements including the final phase of electrification on the Eastern Region arteries and we were just a few years away from the Second World War. The Pennsylvania Railroad was about to rise for its final epic performance moving the largest volume of war-time traffic by rail including freight, supplies, troops and even pow’s. The PRR was a well oiled machine, a culture of traditional railroaders brought up from the ranks. Their financial history was studied to exhaustion as one of the largest corporations of its time, paying financial dividends to its shareholders for over 100 years.

Overbrook Station, a commuter stop on Philadelphia's western edge typifies what initially drew me to document the former PRR. Among a historic station, signals and switch towers operates one of the most recently upgraded Amtrak routes in the Northeast, the Keystone Corridor. This route was originally the main line west from Philadelphia and played a big part in shaping the surrounding landscape known locally as "The Main Line".

Overbrook Station, a commuter stop on Philadelphia's western edge typifies what initially drew me to document the former PRR. Among a historic station, signals and switch towers operates one of the most recently upgraded Amtrak routes in the Northeast, the Keystone Corridor. This route was originally the main line west from Philadelphia and played a big part in shaping the surrounding landscape known locally as "The Main Line".

So it seems like there is no contest, why not study a company, a railroad and a culture of this stature? Frankly, my documentation initially had nothing to do with its corporate significance, or how many of miles of track or tons of freight it was responsible for, because all of that was long gone before I had ever heard of the Pennsylvania Railroad. So what was it then, that a kid could have been captivated with so many years ago compelling one later to embark on such an ambitious project to document something that was gone well over 35 years? The simple answer is infrastructure. The ubiquitous GG-1s and tuscan red passenger cars were gone and the fabled giant went down in one of the greatest financial disasters of all time, but the infrastructure, the engineering, the character of visionary railroad men still survived.

The Pennsylvania Railroad made a significant impact on the landscape that few can ignore, for its something millions of commuters, regional and long distance travelers interface with daily, defining rail travel on what is now commonly referred to as the Northeast Corridor.  West of Harrisburg the main line evolved as one of the most important arteries for freight between the Mid Atlantic and Chicago, funneling container, general merchandise and mineral trains east and west. The former PRR main line is a linear corridor of history: linking town, country and city together, illustrating the impact the railroad had on the American landscape.  Along this corridor modern successors operate among relics of the past: stations, interlocking towers, junctions and rail yards that all tell the story of how the mighty PRR once functioned. Despite modern operations many of these relics were built with such forethought that they still play an integral role in operating parts of the nation’s only high-speed rail network and one of Norfolk Southern's most important routes, a nod to PRR's engineering ability. By examining the Pennsylvania Railroad past and present we can begin to understand the evolution of the northeastern American landscape, the railroad and industry of a rich and historic region.

This article is the second in a series of posts that explore the Main Line Project, its origins and methodologies in documenting the former Pennsylvania Railroad.

In Retrospect

Summer break has certainly allowed for time to stop and think about the evolution of my creative work, in particular my documentation of the former Pennsylvania Railroad. Since January I have put together several public lectures that provided an opportunity to look at my own work from a perspective that is very different from the process of just making images. Writing these lectures, I began to articulate my process and approach which connects my photographic endeavors to a life long curiosity that inspires me explore the very subjects I have been enamored with since childhood.

A lone commuter detrains from a Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines train at the Gardens Station on the Ocean City Branch, October 1950. This facility was located between North Street and Battersea in the neighborhood along modern day Sindia Road and was abandoned in late 1958. It was photographs like this that captivated me at an early age and today   hangs in my office to remind me of my early curiosity of railroad history. Photograph by Robert L. Long, collection of the author.

A lone commuter detrains from a Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines train at the Gardens Station on the Ocean City Branch, October 1950. This facility was located between North Street and Battersea in the neighborhood along modern day Sindia Road and was abandoned in late 1958. It was photographs like this that captivated me at an early age and today hangs in my office to remind me of my early curiosity of railroad history. Photograph by Robert L. Long, collection of the author.

At an early age we all form some unhealthy obsession with inanimate objects, whether it be trains, trucks, legos or even dolls, but at some point most grow out of it. Not me! Since the age of three I've have had a fascination with railroads. I loved the models and of course enjoyed seeing freight or passenger trains pass by, but what really peaked my curiosity was the idea of where those trains were going and why. I grew up in Southern New Jersey, a place where regularly scheduled passenger trains whisked people to the shore resorts of Atlantic City, Ocean City, Wildwood and Cape May over 75 years ago. The region was home to the unique operations of the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines where bitter rivals the Pennsylvania Railroad and the Reading Railroad came together after a consolidation of operations in the 1930's. Providing through passenger service, Camden-Philadelphia ferry service, commuter and freight operations this system thrived in the summer months moving countless vacationers by rail to the resorts and offered scaled down operations after the peak summer season. By the time I was alive, the former PRSL network had become a part of Conrail, and the few remaining passenger runs would come to an end in 1982.

I remember the former PRSL RDC cars in Cape May and Lindenwold and occasional trips to Philadelphia with my father and grandfather recall seeing the inside of Reading Terminal's 1890's train shed and the countless trains that passed behind the Philadelphia Civic Center. Expressing an interest in trains, one summer our baby sitter took my brother and I to visit her uncle who worked at Pavonia  Yard in Camden the major terminal for former PRSL operations; We visited the hump yard, Brown interlocking tower in South Camden and even rode a locomotive on the industrial tracks near Bulson Street Yard. I was bit…even more curious, about why these lines existed, wanting to know about the stations and facilities that survived and the industries the railroad served. Many times I begged my father to take Atlantic Ave along the Clementon Branch just to follow the tracks in hopes to spot some old artifact or a view of one of the stations. I turned to books like By Rail to the Boardwalk, The Atlantic City Railroad, The Trail of the Blue Comet, and Trains to America's Playground, many of them books from members of the local West Jersey Chapter of the NRHS. These books were my gateway to feeding a curiosity that would never subside. Through subsequent travels with my father to Altoona including an infamous snowy hike up to MG tower near the famous Horseshoe Curve and road trips with friends once I was licensed to drive, I continued to explore both close to home and along the former PRR, using very basic photography to document what I saw.

East Broad Top steam line-up, Rockhill Furnace, October, 1999. One of the projects I successfully incorporated the railroad into my collegiate experience was a Advanced Documentary class. I spent 8 weekend in the fall of 1999 driving several hundred miles to photograph the fabled East Broad Top Railroad. Little did I know then, this would be the last year they had four locomotives under steam, let alone the railroad would be shuttered today. 

East Broad Top steam line-up, Rockhill Furnace, October, 1999. One of the projects I successfully incorporated the railroad into my collegiate experience was a Advanced Documentary class. I spent 8 weekend in the fall of 1999 driving several hundred miles to photograph the fabled East Broad Top Railroad. Little did I know then, this would be the last year they had four locomotives under steam, let alone the railroad would be shuttered today. 

This led to another unhealthy obsession, the need to understand and master the photographic process. A typical teenager trying to find their voice, I found the the whole medium fascinating - it was one that was both technical and creative. After a few courses in community college, I had decided to pursue photography enrolling in Drexel University's Photography Program in 1998. While attending Drexel in West Philadelphia I was surrounded by landmarks of the former Pennsylvania Railroad’s sprawling terminal facilities including 30th Street Station, the West Philadelphia Elevated Branch, Penn Coach Yard and Powelton Ave Yards. Though my interest in railroads had taken a back seat to other subjects, I had always found myself captivated by places and things that I had learned about through my research of railroad operations. On occasion I turned to railroads for subject matter in class projects but more often gravitated to the landscape, enjoying the sanctity of the open spaces of rural Southern New Jersey and the vernacular architecture of farming and agricultural communities. I spent considerable time exploring and photographing places along the Delaware River, trying to understand issues on land usage and how industry and recreational activities impacted the landscape. I took inspiration by a host of  photographers like William Clift, Frank Gholke, Art Sinsabaugh, Walker Evans and George Tice. Reading the book, They All Fall Down, I was taken by the tireless work of Richard Nickel to photograph and preserve the buildings of famed Chicago architect Louis Sullivan in the 1960's and 70's which sparked my own interest to document landmark buildings that were once prominent structures in Philadelphia society. Eventually termed the Relic Project this work would be the first in which I realized that my work was more than just "fine art" but could serve as a means for preservation, something that Nickel had taken so serious it literally killed him. 

Erdner Warehouses, Woodstown, NJ. This image was from a series that started in college, photographing the agricultural regions of Salem, Cumberland and Gloucester Counties, what little is left of the Garden State of New Jersey. 

Erdner Warehouses, Woodstown, NJ. This image was from a series that started in college, photographing the agricultural regions of Salem, Cumberland and Gloucester Counties, what little is left of the Garden State of New Jersey. 

The diversity of my explorations contributed to building a visual toolbox that would guide my work after graduation. Free of worry about what others thought about my work, or what grade I would receive, photography was about what I wanted to do with the creative process. It took several years of experience and understanding that came from different projects but with time I gravitated back to the very subject that started it all: the railroad and not just the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines but the mighty Pennsylvania Railroad. Where would the project go? What should the work look like? I really didn’t know, but if I didn’t take the chance in 2007, I wouldn’t be here sharing this with you today. The Main Line Project and the rest of my photographic endeavors are the culmination of life long interests, the intersection of a love affair of trains, history, architecture and geography.

This article is the first of a series of posts that explore the Main Line Project, its origins, methodologies and ideas that not only influence this project but the way I generally explore art and life.

New Website is Live!

Dear Friends, Since the Library Company lecture early in March I have fallen off the radar, but for good reason! I am excited to announce my revamped website, michaelfroio.com which just went live! I have been considering a change in service  for a while and finally began the process a few weeks ago after seeing the huge improvement in image quality and functionality that my new host, Livebooks offers. On the new site you will find more and larger images for the Main Line Project which was in desperate need of an update, including text on each of the Regions/ Divisions covered in the three portfolios. In addition to the Main Line Project you will find the Relic and Watershed Portfolios have been freshened up and reorganized for improved navigation. Of course the site still maintains a link to the blog, sections for news and updates, contact info and social media. I hope you take the time to check out the site, please feel free to email me with any feedback. I should note that the new site utilizes a Flash based template, and IOs users will be pointed to an HTML mirror site which looks and functions much like the main site.

Again the website address is www.michaelfroio.com. I look forward to hearing from you!

Best Regards,

Michael Froio

William H. Rau and the Pennsylvania Railroad

(L) William H. Rau portrait circa 1908. (R) Rau and his assistants setting up his camera along the Conemaugh River at the Packsaddle near present day Torrance, Pennsylvania, circa 1891. Both images collection of the Library Company of Philadelphia.

(L) William H. Rau portrait circa 1908. (R) Rau and his assistants setting up his camera along the Conemaugh River at the Packsaddle near present day Torrance, Pennsylvania, circa 1891. Both images collection of the Library Company of Philadelphia.

William Herman Rau, born in 1853, was a Philadelphia based commercial photographer whose relationship with the Pennsylvania Railroad spanned his 35-year career in the business. Though he had numerous assignments with the railroad over the years, it would be two commissions that brought Rau to our attention in the 20th Century. The first assignment was from June to September 1891, the second, April to July of 1893. The commission utilized the relatively new concept of advertising photography to entice the leisure traveler to explore the American landscape by way of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Illustrating the terrain and destinations along the system, Rau worked with a mammoth plate view camera in the field, traveling in a customized passenger coach complete with living quarters and darkroom, creating almost 500 dry plate glass negatives during the two commissions.

Plate 202: Special Photographic Train. This image depicts the locomotive and car outfitted for Rau's commissions of 1891 and 1893. The coach was specially outfitted with a complete darkroom, living quarters and a platform on the roof for Rau to set up his mammoth plate view camera to make images along the railroad. Collection of American Premier Underwriters, Inc.

Plate 202: Special Photographic Train. This image depicts the locomotive and car outfitted for Rau's commissions of 1891 and 1893. The coach was specially outfitted with a complete darkroom, living quarters and a platform on the roof for Rau to set up his mammoth plate view camera to make images along the railroad. Collection of American Premier Underwriters, Inc.

In April of this year, it will be 120 years since Rau’s second commission: Through those years the mighty Pennsylvania Railroad rose to the occasion during times of war and fell to its demise in an unthinkable marriage with bitter rival the New York Central. Having never experienced the Pennsylvania Railroad first hand, it was Rau’s work that led me to understand a young and expanding railroad at the dawn of the 20th Century. In the details of Rau’s rich large format albumen prints we see a railroad building for the future, a railroad that today leaves a legacy of engineering accomplishments, providing the subjects for a modern photographic survey. Working backwards to recreate a visual tour of the former Pennsylvania Railroad, the Main Line Project relies heavily on the visual clues of Rau’s work to make informed and inspired images.

In the coming weeks I am very excited to share more about the Rau commission and how it has impacted my project From the Main Line. These posts are part of a lecture on March 7th at the Library Company of Philadelphia, who has on deposit over 450 original images from the Pennsylvania Railroad Commission. If you are in the Philadelphia area I encourage you to RSVP for the lecture, March 7th at the Library Company of Philadelphia. The presentation will discuss how the dialogue between a historic and contemporary photo project evolves and will include a few original prints from Rau and myself in addition to the excellent exhibition, Frank Furness: Working on the Railroads. The Furness installation includes an amazing collection of artifacts, photographs and architectural drawings of architectural commissions for the Reading, Pennsylvania and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads.

Understanding the Pennsylvania Railroad: Part 1

A Dialogue with the Historic Photographs of William H. Rau

Plate 199. Stone Bridge at Johnstown by William H Rau. Collection of American Premier Underwriters

Plate 199. Stone Bridge at Johnstown by William H Rau. Collection of American Premier Underwriters

In 2003, about four years before I began the Main Line Project, I saw an exhibition of works by photographer William H Rau who was commissioned by the Pennsylvania Railroad in the 1890’s to photograph the landscape and destinations along the main line. When I began the project in 2007, my intention was not to create a re-photographic survey but a modern portfolio of images exploring the railroad and its impact on the surrounding landscape. Rau’s work provided the first insight that a project like this could exist without the implicit use of just the trains themselves but by exploring the landscape, technology and the phenomena of the railroad corridor, which creates a uniquely built environment bridging city, country and towns alike. Rau’s commission left an impact on me that has continually evolved with the project to this day.

The stone bridge in Rau's photograph above survives today, though altered with reinforced concrete on its south side. This is one of the few images in the Main Line Project that present the opportunity to visualize the railroad 120 years ago versus today in the same (or similar) location.

The stone bridge in Rau's photograph above survives today, though altered with reinforced concrete on its south side. This is one of the few images in the Main Line Project that present the opportunity to visualize the railroad 120 years ago versus today in the same (or similar) location.

In the coming weeks I am very excited to share more about the Rau commission and how it has impacted my project From the Main Line. These posts will culminate into a lecture on March 7th at the Library Company of Philadelphia, who has on deposit, over 450 original images from the Pennsylvania Railroad Commission. In addition to this lecture, you will be seeing more of Mr. Rau’s work on my blog thanks to the help of the Library Company of Philadelphia and the cooperation of American Premier Underwriters who owns the historic collection. Part of a larger effort to incorporate more historical imagery in my research, Rau’s photos will compliment works from the Lancaster Historical Society’s Collection and the Columbia Historic Preservation Society Collection to detail past operations, facilities and the landscape along the Main Line.

If you are in the Philadelphia area I encourage you to RSVP for the lecture March 7th at the Library Company of Philadelphia. The presentation will discuss how the dialogue between a historic and contemporary photo project evolves and will include a few original prints from Rau and myself in addition to the excellent exhibition, Frank Furness: Working on the Railroads. The installation includes an amazing collection of artifacts, photographs and architectural drawings of Furness commissions for the Reading, Pennsylvania and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads.

2013 Center for Railroad Photography and Art Conference Announced!

I am excited to officially announce that I have been invited to present a lecture on the Mainline Project at the 11th annual Conversations about Photography Conference, a wonderful event put on by the Center for Railroad Photography and Art. Having attended for the first time this past April I was blown away by the variety and quality of the entire production, to be a part of the next conference is an honor for me! The lecture will tie into the article published recently about the Mainline Project in the NRHS Bulletin and will feature many new images for the continuing effort of documenting the former Pennsylvania Railroad system. The Center for Railroad Photography & Art has become America's foremost organization for interpreting the intersection of railroad art and culture with America's history and culture. Founded in 1997 and based in Madison, Wisconsin the Center works with photographers, writers, and historians across the country to achieve its goals. Since the beginning, the Center has offered high quality public programs associated with photography and art works in all media. Their annual conference, "Conversations about Photography," and awards program, both established in 2003, set the pace for national discussion about contemporary railroad photography and encouragement of young photographers to become a part of the community. Lake Forest College's archives and special collections department acts as a co-sponsor and hosts the conference. The announcement was released in the newest Railroad Heritage journal, the Center's quarterly publication, following Center founder John Gruber's excellent article about the Pennsylvania Railroad's use of photography throughout the company's 121 year history. The 2013 conference will be held at the beautiful Lake Forest Illinois campus April 12-14th, more details including additional featured guests, registration information and schedules will follow.

Please enjoy the article below or click here to download a PDF version for your enjoyment! For more information on the Center for Railroad Photography and Art please visit their website.

CRPA_Conversations copy

Harrisburg Passenger Station

Front elevation drawing of the Harrisburg Train Station.   (below) Detail drawings of the fireplace and floor tile work. Drawings collection of the Historic American Engineering Record, National Park Service drawn by Harry Weese & Associates  .

Front elevation drawing of the Harrisburg Train Station. (below) Detail drawings of the fireplace and floor tile work. Drawings collection of the Historic American Engineering Record, National Park Service drawn by Harry Weese & Associates.

Harrisburg was at the crossroads of the eastern system, and the largest city on the PRR between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. From the east passenger trains originated from Philadelphia, New York City, Baltimore and Washington DC, from the west traffic came via Buffalo and Pittsburgh gateways to the North, South and West.

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The surviving passenger station, built between 1885-87 is the third such built by the PRR in the general area between Mulberry and Market Streets. Constructed of brick and stone, the Queen Anne style station was altered several times during the early 20th Century and featured details like facing granite and brick fireplaces in the main waiting room, coffered ceilings, wood paneling and intricate mosaic tile floor patterns. After a destructive fire in 1904, the station was completely remodeled restoring the unique gambrel roof while converting the attic space into a third floor for offices adding the eight dormers on the front (east) elevation. A major addition to facilitate the electrification to Harrisburg in 1936-37 added a two story, three bay extensions on the south end of the building to accommodate the new Power Dispatcher’s facility and State Interlocking.

Train shed interior looking east. Notice the intricate iron work on the stair railings and trusses. The active center platform has been elevated to accommodate Amtrak/ ADA compliance needs but the remaining low level platforms are still traditional herringbone brick with stone curbs. This shed is one of few remaining examples of a style of station that was once commonplace in America.

Train shed interior looking east. Notice the intricate iron work on the stair railings and trusses. The active center platform has been elevated to accommodate Amtrak/ ADA compliance needs but the remaining low level platforms are still traditional herringbone brick with stone curbs. This shed is one of few remaining examples of a style of station that was once commonplace in America.

The surviving train sheds behind and to the east of the station were of even greater significance. When constructed they were considered some of the largest of its time, utilizing historic Fink trusses constructed of wood and iron to support the roof. The twin station sheds were extended at various times and measure roughly 540 feet in length providing shelter to 8 of the 10 station tracks maintained in the busy terminal.

View from photographer Harlen Hambright, taken during the 1981 HAER survey. Survey caption reads "View, looking north (railroad west) under shed from concourse, showing exposed truss after shed roofing was removed." Collection of the Historic American Engineering Record, National Park Service.

View from photographer Harlen Hambright, taken during the 1981 HAER survey. Survey caption reads "View, looking north (railroad west) under shed from concourse, showing exposed truss after shed roofing was removed." Collection of the Historic American Engineering Record, National Park Service.

Current view of the south (railroad east) end of the station bound by the Mulberry Street Viaduct itself a beautiful curved concrete arch bridge. The track curving off from the bottom right is Norfolk Southern's connection with the former Reading Company Lebanon Branch, now part of the busy Harrisburg Line. The track immediately behind that and parallel to the station is the Royalton Branch which provides freight an alternate route off the Port Road via Shocks Mill, running alongside Amtrak's Keystone Line west of Roy Interlocking.

Current view of the south (railroad east) end of the station bound by the Mulberry Street Viaduct itself a beautiful curved concrete arch bridge. The track curving off from the bottom right is Norfolk Southern's connection with the former Reading Company Lebanon Branch, now part of the busy Harrisburg Line. The track immediately behind that and parallel to the station is the Royalton Branch which provides freight an alternate route off the Port Road via Shocks Mill, running alongside Amtrak's Keystone Line west of Roy Interlocking.

Today the passenger terminal and sheds survive and are on the National Register of Historic Places and are also designated as a National Engineering Landmark. Known as the Harrisburg Transportation Center, the building serves both bus lines and Amtrak, where the Keystone Service from Philadelphia and New York Terminates, and the daily New York – Pittsburgh Pennsylvanian calls in each direction. While passenger train service is a mere ghost of what it used to be, the historic building survives as a monument of what rail travel used to be for future generations.

Situated on the former #5 Station track, PRR class GG-1# #4859 resides as part of a permanent display owned and maintained by the Harrisburg Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society, also accompanied by a class N6b PRR Cabin Car (caboose to non-PRR people). The 4859 is of particular significance to Harrisburg as it hauled the first scheduled electric powered passenger train into the station in 1938. The locomotive was part of a fleet of 140 locomotives built by both the PRR in Altoona and General Electric, the ubiquitous G,  was the workhorse of both the limiteds, regional and local passenger/ mail trains as well as freight on the PRR. The last operational  GG-1 ran in October of 1983 and 16 survive around the US as static displays.

Situated on the former #5 Station track, PRR class GG-1# #4859 resides as part of a permanent display owned and maintained by the Harrisburg Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society, also accompanied by a class N6b PRR Cabin Car (caboose to non-PRR people). The 4859 is of particular significance to Harrisburg as it hauled the first scheduled electric powered passenger train into the station in 1938. The locomotive was part of a fleet of 140 locomotives built by both the PRR in Altoona and General Electric, the ubiquitous G,  was the workhorse of both the limiteds, regional and local passenger/ mail trains as well as freight on the PRR. The last operational  GG-1 ran in October of 1983 and 16 survive around the US as static displays.

Upcoming Exhibition

Westbound Freight and Carrie Furnace, Braddock, Pennsylvania   If you are in the area please stop by to see my piece in the Noyes Museum show celebrating 30 artists who have received individual artist fellowships from the NJ Council of the Arts.

Westbound Freight and Carrie Furnace, Braddock, Pennsylvania If you are in the area please stop by to see my piece in the Noyes Museum show celebrating 30 artists who have received individual artist fellowships from the NJ Council of the Arts.

New Jersey Council on the Arts Individual Artists Fellowship Group Exhibition Noyes Museum of Art, Oceanville, New Jersey June 8 - September 9, 2012 Opening Reception: June 8, 2012, 5:00 - 8:00 pm

Westward to Lake Forest!

Finished product (1 of3) of over a week of average three hours of sleep to build three new portfolios of the Mainline Project for the trip to Lake Forest, Illinois  for this years Center for Railroad Photography and Art Annual Conference!

Finished product (1 of3) of over a week of average three hours of sleep to build three new portfolios of the Mainline Project for the trip to Lake Forest, Illinois  for this years Center for Railroad Photography and Art Annual Conference!

While I have been posting regularly, the last few weeks I got a little bogged down, but for good reason. Since I will be attending the Center for Railroad Photography and Art Conference this weekend in Lake Forest, Illinois I decided at the last minute to build new portfolios for the occasion including a selection of images from recent work with Amtrak. I'm looking forward to being a part of the event and the chance to show some of the new work, there is a lot of it! I will return in a few weeks to continue our tour of the Harrisburg Terminal and then begin to move east on the former Philadelphia Division of the PRR. Stay tuned for more exciting news and posts as I continue plugging away at a very productive year, and thanks for your continued interest and support!

Juniata River Valley: Part 4

Confluence

In a series of single image posts, I would like to share the beauty of the Juniata River Valley, which plays host to the former Pennsylvania Railroad’s famed Middle Division, a four track water level raceway between Harrisburg and Altoona Pennsylvania. The Juniata, who’s name is thought derive from Iroquoian word Onayutta, meaning "Standing Stone" is roughly 104 miles long, and encompassing 3400 square miles of watershed was the original course North of Harrisburg that the Mainline Department of Public Works and later the PRR would build along to push West to Pittsburgh. At the confluence of the Susquehanna River in Duncannon Pennsylvania, the Railroad follows the broad shallow path of the River as far West as Huntingdon Pennsylvania. In the small town of Duncannon Pennsylvania, is the confluence of the beautiful Susquehanna and the Juniata Rivers. Though I have discussed Duncannon in relation to the railroad, the River deserves a special notice. In a broad sweeping view we see the wide rivers coming together, looking upstream toward the confluence. To the left is the waters of the Juniata, and right, the Susquehanna. In the distance one can see the Route 322/22 bridge spanning the Susquehanna (the bridge of the Juniata is partially obscured). This area is well known by PRR fans as the Mainline swept around a long curve right against the River and provided a beautiful backdrop on any given day.