Photographs & History

Photographs and History

Changing Pace: Other Attributes of the Main Line Project

As the main line tour progresses I have been doing a lot of thinking about the direction of my blog posts during my seemingly endless research on the physical plant of the former Pennsylvania Railroad. In the process of producing this tour I have been ignoring a large part of the project, the towns the railroad traveled through. These places large and small developed around natural resources and manufacturing, much of which revolved around iron and steel production. The landscape of Pennsylvania, Eastern Ohio and West VA first began expanding because of natural and man-made waterways, which provided industry with a means of transportation to expand their markets. Though a major advancement, canals and rivers were subject to seasonal changes shutting down shipping with the winter freeze and summer droughts. It quickly became evident that a better mode of transportation was needed and the railroad was the answer. Politicians, lobbyists and industrial magnates fought for access to prime locations, rail lines were chartered, built and continually improved through the late 19th Century.  As a result towns along the railroad boomed, people were no longer in isolated communities but part of an industrial chain that drove the American economy. With the new ability to move large quantities of raw material and finished product across the country the steel industry expanded and so did the need for labor. Immigrants came by the thousands to places scattered across the region to work the mills, mines and for the railroads. The ethnic diversity was reflected in the various churches, neighborhoods and shops that brought the familiar comforts of the old country to this new place of work. Throughout the years there have been high times and lows in many of these towns, rocked by labor disputes, natural disasters and the eventual decline of the American steel industry.

The view from Singer Street in Johnstown, Pennsylvania exemplifies the somber beauty of mill towns across Pennsylvania. Homes cling to the hillsides and business districts look toward the mill, once the focal point to the local economy. Today countless places like Johnstown are a quiet memorial to the era of steel and manufacturing across the region. 

The view from Singer Street in Johnstown, Pennsylvania exemplifies the somber beauty of mill towns across Pennsylvania. Homes cling to the hillsides and business districts look toward the mill, once the focal point to the local economy. Today countless places like Johnstown are a quiet memorial to the era of steel and manufacturing across the region. 

Today many of these places serve as a monument to industry and a way of life that has disappeared. The villages, company towns and entire sections of cities often look onto the mill, celebrating the pride and prosperity these now abandoned places once provided for many hard working families. I have found myself completely entranced by places like Johnstown and Braddock, places that are a fraction of their former self, wondering what it was like when these places were in their prime. In residential areas there is little uniformity from house to house with the exceptions of clusters of company housing yet all of these places look oddly the same. Frame houses on hill sides, all slightly modified over the years or just plain neglected, empty streets and brown fields, virtually deserted town squares flanked with grand commercial buildings constructed of stone and terracotta, town by town the theme repeats.

East Conemaugh was situated across from the Franklin Works of Cambria Iron, later Bethlehem Steel. The mills are gone and the rail yards empty, the Main Line of the Pennsylvania Railroad still enters town on the far side of the Conemaugh River, the final resting place of engineer John Hess who used his locomotive whistle to warn the townspeople of the impending destruction of the great flood of 1889. 

East Conemaugh was situated across from the Franklin Works of Cambria Iron, later Bethlehem Steel. The mills are gone and the rail yards empty, the Main Line of the Pennsylvania Railroad still enters town on the far side of the Conemaugh River, the final resting place of engineer John Hess who used his locomotive whistle to warn the townspeople of the impending destruction of the great flood of 1889. 

Like much of my work, this imagery is an observation, part of connecting the dots to understand a particular place or landscape. To many its a bleak and depressing place, I am often asked why bother visiting let alone taking pictures, some locals even get mad that an outsider would objectify their struggling community. To me the typical mill town is a comforting and familiar place, one of repetition and rhythm. You can find something different in every visit, grand and ornate homes in a row of company buildings, five story apartment houses in a town that doesn’t even rate a gas station, and the rail line that once fed this industrial giant snaking along from town to town. This is where the Main Line of the Pennsylvania Railroad once travelled, the towns it built, nurtured and its predecessors served until the industry dried up. The railroad still thrives but like many places, the trains don’t stop here anymore. The mill town is a place of beauty in its own right, and I am happy to have experienced every one of them and look forward to sharing a different viewpoint of the built landscape that came as result of the railroads and industry. Over the coming months you can expect images celebrating these places as work continues on understanding the late Pennsylvania Railroad and the landscape it travelled. Enjoy!

Philadelphia Division: Steelton

View of Pennsylvania Steel Works, Steelton, Pennsylvania circa 1909,Collection of the Library of Congress. Inset image a vintage stock certificate of Pennsylvania Steel Company Circa  1882. Collection of  VintageStocksandBonds.blogspot.com

View of Pennsylvania Steel Works, Steelton, Pennsylvania circa 1909,Collection of the Library of Congress. Inset image a vintage stock certificate of Pennsylvania Steel Company Circa  1882. Collection of VintageStocksandBonds.blogspot.com

Philadelphia Division: Steelton

Leaving Harrisburg station and State Interlocking both the mainline and Columbia branch follow the east bank of the Susquehanna River through the industrial town of Steelton. Incorporated in 1880 the town was host to Pennsylvania Steel, originally owned by fierce competitors the Pennsylvania Railroad and Philadelphia & Reading.  Sold to Bethlehem Steel in 1915, the plant included four blast furnaces, billet mills, blooming mills and open-hearth facilities. At one time Steelton produced structural steel, rail, bar, pipe and other specialty products for the railroad industry  which  continues today under successor ArcelorMittal. Though the PRR and Reading served the Pennsylvania Steel facility, the Steelton & Highspire Railroad provided in plant switching through out the various facilties as well as working the interchange points with the parent roads. A majority of this activity ran right along North Front Street in the town's commercial district where at any time one could find multiple crews working.

View looking west down Blackberry Alley, Steelton, Pennsylvania. Note the massive steel facilities that dominate the western view from the hill.

View looking west down Blackberry Alley, Steelton, Pennsylvania. Note the massive steel facilities that dominate the western view from the hill.

Like many industrial towns through out the east, Steelton and neighboring Highspire are not the job and economic centers they once were, but nonetheless they survive and still depend on the remaining heavy industry and trade jobs associated with steel production. Flanked along the hillside, overlooking the mill, many one time company homes, churches and small businesses make up the culturally diverse neighborhoods of Steelton. The view of the sprawling works will forever remind the residents of how Steelton came to be and its contributions to the growth of America.