Photographs & History

Photographs and History

Munhall Yard on the PRR Mon Line

View southeast from the Rankin Bridge of the Mon Line and Union Railroad Interchange. From left to right, the first four tracks serve as the interchange leads for Munhall Yard, the last two are the main tracks of the Mon Line, now a double stack bypass for NS container trains with clearance issues on the mainline through Pittsburgh proper. Note the US Steel Edgar Thompson Works in the background in the industrial town of Braddock across the Monongahela River.

View southeast from the Rankin Bridge of the Mon Line and Union Railroad Interchange. From left to right, the first four tracks serve as the interchange leads for Munhall Yard, the last two are the main tracks of the Mon Line, now a double stack bypass for NS container trains with clearance issues on the mainline through Pittsburgh proper. Note the US Steel Edgar Thompson Works in the background in the industrial town of Braddock across the Monongahela River.

Formerly known as Munhall Yard, this location on the former PRR Mon Line (short for Monongahela, the River the line follows)  was an important interchange with Union Railroad, operated by  United States Steel (USS). The Union Railroad at one time served several major steel making facilities in the Pittsburgh area and remains integral to the Irvin Works, Edgar Thompson Works, Clairton Coke production facility hauling raw materials and finished product to the mills and interchanges. To the southeast of this location the Mon line Connects with the Port Perry Branch, crossing the Monongahela River and eventually connecting to the Mainline near Pitcarin. From that junction the Mon continues south to connect with famed Monongahela Railroad in West Brownsville PA. In the background, across the river is the last remaining integrated mill in Pittsburgh, the Edgar Thompson Works of United States Steel, still a major customer of the railroads.

Duncannon, Pennsylvania

Duncannon

Duncannon is a quiet little riverside town that sits just below the confluence of the Juniata and Susquehanna Rivers in Perry County Pennsylvania. Along the banks of the Susquehanna runs the Middle Division of the former Pennsylvania Railroad. Above, we see the view from Cumberland Street looking East toward the former Passenger Station on Water Street. The beautiful brick and wood design is similar to neighboring Marysville, and Newport stations both of which survive today.

Mifflin Depot

mifflintowndepot

Built in 1913 after the expansion of the Mainline to the trademark four track "Broad Way", the Mifflin Depot still stands today. While passenger service ended in 1957, the building has continued to serve maintenance personnel along the line. Seen here on a typical Fall morning with a dense fog yet to burn off, the Mission style bay and classic details still look good after almost 100 years and four owners.

Main Street, Mifflin PA

mifflint

In Mifflin Pennsylvania, at the foot of Main Street and Railroad Ave, the famed Middle Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad comes through on a North-South alignment. Mifflin, a sleepy town across the Juniata River from Mifflintown, was probably a result of the need to connect the town to the railroad and the outside world. Its a typical town along the river valley, with beautiful old Victorian houses. In the left of Image you can see the Brick Depot, now a maintainers office for Norfolk Southern. The station is in fair shape and has a unique design complete with terracotta roof and what remains of the yellow brick platforms. While the Mainline appears to be four tracks as it was in its heyday, the furthest track is actually a runner to a small yard and industrial track immediately to the West.