Photographs & History

Photographs and History

PRR: Summit of the Allegheny Mountains

PRR

At the Summit of the Allegheny Range we look east on Sugar Run Valley in Cambria County PA. Immediately below us #3 track exits the New Portage Tunnel, this is the eastbound main commonly referred to as "the slide" on account of its 2.0 to 2.36 grade descending the Summit. Joining from the left, tracks 1 and 2 curve around from Gallitzin and Allegheny Tunnel (now just the newer Gallitzin Tunnel since Conrail increased clearances on the line in the 1990's). While the line is quiet during a steady mid-day rain, activity here can be quite impressive, watching west-bounds top the Allegheny Range and eastbound trains begin there descent to Horseshoe Curve and ultimately Altoona the eastern base of the climb.

Mainline for the Holidays

PRR Summerhill PA

We find ourselves in the tiny village of Summerhill PA on the West Slope of the PRR's ascent of the Allegheny Mountains. What is missing to the viewer is the smell of coal fired stoves, and the silent still of a fresh early morning snow. The temperature is about 28 degrees, and the sound of another eastbound is prominent as the Signal on No. 1 track beckons on with a "Proceed" indication on the company's trademark position light signals. Even though this is Norfolk Southern's property now, the spirit of the Pennsy lives on through so many who are dedicated to the preservation of all facets of this once self proclaimed "Standard Railroad of the World".

Thank you for all you interest in my first year of this blog, from my family to yours I would like to wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy and Healthy New year!

Sincerely,

Michael Froio

A story from Pier 122

Below is a story from Randy Leiser, who came across the post on Pier 122 and 124. I really enjoyed his story and graciously, he has agreed to post it here as a tribute to his Grandfather, Ted Leiser and the many other men and women that worked for the Pennsylvania Railroad. My grandfather worked at Pier 122 for twenty plus years, from when it was new in the 1950s till the late 1970s or early 1980s (I don't know exactly when he retired).  When I was a kid (I was born in 1971) I knew that he "drove a pusher locomotive on a pier," but not much more.  Being a kid, I guess I just never asked--even though I liked trains.  He passed away when I was 16.

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Views of Pier 122 including the Unloading Cranes and loading tipple and Narrow Gage Pusher Engines that Ted Leiser operated  .

Views of Pier 122 including the Unloading Cranes and loading tipple and Narrow Gage Pusher Engines that Ted Leiser operated.

When my kids came along (the first in 2004, the second in 2006) I began to get them interested in trains, too, which revived my interest in them as well.  I began teaching my boys all about trains--steam, diesel, passenger, freight, etc.

One day around 2008, I asked my dad about where my grandfather had worked.  He told me that it was "on a pier, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge, unloading ore ships.  You know, those big black cranes."  As soon as I heard that I recalled my grandfather having brought home a box of different ore pellets, each labelled with its country of origin.  I also recalled seeing the cranes every time we crossed the Walt Whitman Bridge--even though I didn't know what I was looking at.

I told my kids about their great grandfather, and how he operated a locomotive, etc.  They were quite interested, but I didn't have much more to offer them. A few months later, in 2009, I began Googling "Pennsylvania Tidewater Dock Company," which my dad had told me was the name of the company that operated the locomotives on the pier.  There were few references, and most entries referred to the company's Ohio location.  However, I found an obscure reference to Pennsylvania Tidewater Dock that mentioned Pier 122--the first time I heard the pier's name.  I began Googling "Pier 122" and back came a flood of entries.  I began reading everything I could find.  Before I knew it I'd found a ton of info on the pier, and even photos of the four locomotives they had.  I kept reading, and discovered that one of the four locomotives was saved by the National Museum of Industrial History in Bethlehem, PA!  Pier 122 imported ore that was sent to Bethlehem Steel, and when the steel plant closed, they made provisions for a museum--the narrow gauge locomotive was of interest to them, and they moved one into storage there, awaiting restoration.

In the space of a few hours I went from knowing very little about my grandfather's job and worksite, to knowing quite a bit, and even discovering that one of "his" locomotives was still around. Still not certain, I showed the pictures I'd found to my dad, who confirmed that it was the same pier, same locomotives, etc.  He even recalled riding in one with my grandfather when he was a kid.  I later found out that my uncle (my dad's brother) worked at the pier as a summer job, working on the locomotives, too.

At this point I was intent on getting to Bethlehem, but it was not going to happen soon, as my wife was pregnant with our third, and road trips were not in our immediate future.  We were, however, traveling to Philadelphia for my wife's care during the pregnancy, and I began wondering what was left of the pier.  I prepared myself with maps and Google satellite images.  On our next trip to Philly, we left early, and I detoured to the Pier.  To my surprise, it was not gated, and we drove right in.

Randy Leiser with his two boys, Paul(left) and Dan(right)on his Grandfather's locomotive.

Randy Leiser with his two boys, Paul(left) and Dan(right)on his Grandfather's locomotive.

To my delight, I looked to the left as we drove in, and still sitting on the narrow gauge horseshoe track were two of the pusher locomotives.  I parked the car, stepped out, and shot a couple dozen pictures.  Then (by this point somewhat sure I wasn't going to get arrested for trespassing) I got my two boys out.  My wife snapped a picture of the three of us, standing in front of one of the locomotives.  I now cherish that shot. My daughter was born just a few weeks later, and on a later trip, we took her and my dad to the pier, where he stared in disbelief at the locomotives, too.

I've always been interested in trains, history, and family, and in this case I had the rare chance to tie them all together. I've done periodic Google searches to see what turns up on the Pier.  That's how I found your blog--and I enjoyed reading that post immensely. In the time since I saw the locomotives the cranes on the pier have been toppled and dismantled.  They're making way for the new Southport container facility.  It's progress, I guess, but I hate to see it go.  Every time I cross the Walt Whitman Bridge, I glance southward toward the pier.

Recently, I acquired a Pennsylvania Railroad 1957 calendar, entitled "Vital Links to World Trade."  It features a view of the Pier 122 cranes, with the horseshoe track visible in the back ground.  (PRR built and owned the pier.  From what I gather Pennsylvania Tidewater Dock operated the pusher locomotives.)  The calendar is in great shape and will hang on the wall of my office, as a reminder of my grandfather.

Randy's Grandfather and former Tidewater Dock Co. Employee Ted Leiser with his wife Grace.

Randy's Grandfather and former Tidewater Dock Co. Employee Ted Leiser with his wife Grace.

Pier 122 and 124: Lost Facilities of the Pennsylvania Railroad

Recently the last of four traveling cranes of the former Pennsylvania Railroad’s pier 122 Ore dock facility in Greenwich Yard fell victim to demolition in a plan to expand container port facilities along the Delaware River Waterfront of South Philadelphia.

View looking East, Pier 122: this view illustrates the massive ore unloading cranes that have recently been removed from the former PRR facility.

View looking East, Pier 122: this view illustrates the massive ore unloading cranes that have recently been removed from the former PRR facility.

With facilities dating back to the early 1900s, Pier 122 and 124 were built in 1929. Pier 124 was equipped with dual 120 ton McMyler rotary dumping units that combined, allowed the railroad to dump a maximum of 800 hopper cars per day into outgoing vessels. Pier 122, although constructed at the same time was expanded through new construction in 1952-1954 primarily to import South American Iron Ore. When opened, the facility's cost was 10 million dollars and originally equipped with two traveling cranes capable of unloading over one million tons in its first year of operation. Two other traveling cranes were added in 1955 and 56 respectively expanding total capacity to over 1.5 million tons per year.

Reinforced Storage Bins: These bins, located in the loading balloon tracks served a large fertilizer storage facility that also received bulk materials via Pier 122.

Reinforced Storage Bins: These bins, located in the loading balloon tracks served a large fertilizer storage facility that also received bulk materials via Pier 122.

Serving the PRR and later Penn Central and finally Conrail Pier 122 has been dormant since mid 1990s prior to the split of Conrail by Norfolk Southern and CSX Transportation, victim to shuttered mills, more modern steel making processes, and more efficient facilities. Neighboring pier 124, the coal loading facility suffered a similar fate earlier when Consol Pier of Baltimore came online, providing shorter transport to export shipping lanes and more modern facilities. The removal of the Pier 122 and presumably 124 will mean another relic of the Pennsylvania Railroad and our industrial past will be gone, soon to be back-filled and paved over for container staging of imports and exports that have become standard in ports around the globe.

This was one of several shunting engines that ran on a narrow gauge track between the standard gauge railroad load out tracks. These units shoved the ore jennies or hopper cars through the load out and on to staging to be assembled into outbound trains.

This was one of several shunting engines that ran on a narrow gauge track between the standard gauge railroad load out tracks. These units shoved the ore jennies or hopper cars through the load out and on to staging to be assembled into outbound trains.