Photographs & History

Photographs and History

Elizabethtown on the Philadelphia Division

Trackside view of the main station building and former baggage elevator tower. This station underwent a renovation beging in 2008 utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds. Today the station is occupied by the Chamber of Commerce but served by Amtrak's Keystone and Pennsylvanian Service. 

Trackside view of the main station building and former baggage elevator tower. This station underwent a renovation beging in 2008 utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds. Today the station is occupied by the Chamber of Commerce but served by Amtrak's Keystone and Pennsylvanian Service. 

The borough of Elizabethtown found its origins in the 1730’s when Thomas Harris purchased a large piece of land and established a trading post along Conoy Creek in what would become western Lancaster County. Known as the Bear Tavern the buisness and land was later purchased by Barnabas Hughes who came from County Donegal, Ireland to establish a town named in his wife’s honor. Elizabethtown was one of the earliest communities settled in the County and owed its early existence to its proximity of a wagon trail that later became the Lancaster – Harrisburg Turnpike.  Elizabethtown was incorporated in 1827 and grew steadily over the years with the Harrisburg, Portsmouth, Mt. Joy and Lancaster Railroad arriving in the 1830’s. By 1848 the PRR contracted a lease with the HPMtJ&L and later purchasing the line to become part of the railroad’s main line between Philadelphia and Harrisburg. In the 1880’s under the leadership of Pennsylvania Railroad President George Brooke Roberts, Chief Engineer William H. Brown would begin a series of improvements to the alignment between Conewago and Elizabethtown. Utilizing several cuts to maintain a .75% grade on the eastbound ascent out of the Swatara Creek Valley and eliminating the troublesome Elizabethtown Tunnel which marked the summit of the eastward grade. Part of the old main was retained to service industrial consignees and a freight house that was located to the north of the new alignment.

Interior detail of the 1915 Passenger Station built by architects Zantzinger, Borie & Medary to match their Masonic Homes Campus on the south side of the Main Line. 

Interior detail of the 1915 Passenger Station built by architects Zantzinger, Borie & Medary to match their Masonic Homes Campus on the south side of the Main Line. 

Elizabethtown was surrounded by rich farmland and for many years thrived on agriculturally related business until the early 1900’s when the Klein Chocolate Company and several shoe factories opened. Around the same time Elizabethtown College was established and later construction of the sprawling Masonic Homes campus broke ground in 1910. Designed by Philadelphia architectural firm Zantzinger, Borie & Medary the Masonic Homes were built in the Collegiate Gothic Style utilizing granite and limestone. The cornerstone of the Grand Lodge Hall was laid in 1911, and as progress continued, the PRR commissioned the same firm to build a new passenger station in a complimentary style. Featuring the same granite walls and limestone trim, the station waiting room was church like with its wood buttresses and large multi-pane windows. The station connected aesthetically with the Masonic Homes and provided direct access from station via a pedestrian underpass right to the campus grounds. With further modifications to the railroad through the area the project included grade separation, elevating the main line to its current height and was completed in 1915.

Former PRR Freight Station located along the original main line alignment prior to the 1915 grade separation through the area. From the left to right the tracks are as follows: Former Klein Chocolate Plant siding, the main industrial lead, and public delivery track/ freight house lead. Note the Main Line on the embankment with switchback siding dropping down onto the old main. The freight house was demolished early this year to make way for much needed parking at the rehabilitated Elizabethtown Amtrak Station. (Inset) 1945 Segment of a PRR CT1000 which lists all line side industries on the PRR. 

Former PRR Freight Station located along the original main line alignment prior to the 1915 grade separation through the area. From the left to right the tracks are as follows: Former Klein Chocolate Plant siding, the main industrial lead, and public delivery track/ freight house lead. Note the Main Line on the embankment with switchback siding dropping down onto the old main. The freight house was demolished early this year to make way for much needed parking at the rehabilitated Elizabethtown Amtrak Station. (Inset) 1945 Segment of a PRR CT1000 which lists all line side industries on the PRR. 

Etown_CT100_45

The station served the PRR, Penn Central and Amtrak when it was shuttered in 1977 due to its deteriorating condition. In 1998 the Borough of Elizabethtown purchased the station from Amtrak and a long and costly renovation began in 2008 utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds. Today the beautifully restored station is occupied by the Chamber of Commerce and serves Amtrak’s revamped Keystone Service Line and the daily Pennsylvanian. Unfortunately as result of the station and Keystone line rehab the need for expanded parking capacity recently necessitated the demolition of the original freight house, which was in disrepair having been vacant for some time. The old main line alignment continues to be serviced by Norfolk Southern Local H22 based out of Dillerville Yard in Lancaster servicing the former Klein Chocolate plant (now a division of Mars), White Oak Mills an elevator and feed facility located on High Street and the occasional car load for off site industries on the remaining public delivery track.