Photographs & History

Photographs and History

PRR Bridge 147, Mt Union Pennsylvania

Upstream side of Bridge 147 on the Former PRR Middle Division, completed in 1906.  Note the center pier (center of the image), expanded to emphasize the center of the bridge, a nod to traditional stone arch bridge building aesthetics. To the immediate right the railroad crosses Croghan Pike, Route 522 and enters town to the North of the sprawling interchange complex of the East broad Top Railroad.

Upstream side of Bridge 147 on the Former PRR Middle Division, completed in 1906.  Note the center pier (center of the image), expanded to emphasize the center of the bridge, a nod to traditional stone arch bridge building aesthetics. To the immediate right the railroad crosses Croghan Pike, Route 522 and enters town to the North of the sprawling interchange complex of the East broad Top Railroad.

Built under the supervision of Chief Engineer Alexander C Shand, Middle Division Bridge Number 147 was completed in 1906. In a tradition started by PRR Chief Engineer William H Brown, with his bridge in Johstown PA spanning the Conemaugh River, the bridge was built of cut stone because of its low maintenance and increased durability over early steel and iron structures. The bridge spanning the Juniata River on the Southeast Side of Mt Union consists of six segmental stone arch spans each 100' in length and 58' wide. Because the bridge consists of an even number of spans, the Center Pier was expanded by 8' to create a visible center to the bridge, a nod to traditional bridge building techniques in which an odd number of spans was utilized to define the center of the structure.  Bridge number 147 brings the former four track main of the PRR into Mt. Union on an elevated fill, avoiding grade crossings through the once bustling interchange town with the East Broad Top Railroad. Today, the bridge serves the Norfolk Southern Corporation's busy two track Pittsburgh Line, though later altered with reinforced concrete casing, the bridge remains another great example of PRR's tradition of Cut Stone masonry bridges that were built to last.